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Issue 228 May 2019

Socialism Today 228 - May 2019

Northern Irelandís dissident republicans

Violence has remained at a relatively low level in Northern Ireland. However, fears of a possible Brexit-imposed hard border and ongoing austerity are stoking tension, issues played on by sectarian politicians on all sides. NIALL MULHOLLAND reviews a book looking at dissident republican groups.


Editorial: socialist red lines needed for Brexit talks

With all the heads of state at the special European Council in Brussels on 10 April seeking to pass on responsibility to someone else for triggering a chaotic breakdown of the renegotiation of British capitalismís relations with the other EU members, the only thing they could agree on was that they couldnít agree anything then. Absolutely nothing has been resolved. Nothing has changed fundamentally for Theresa Mayís precarious position either. As long as Jeremy Corbyn stands firm against the pressure to accept the neoliberal policies of the EU bossesí club, May does not have the votes for her withdrawal agreement treaty.


A manifesto to change the world?

What force is needed to end the discrimination and division rooted in the capitalist system? Can the global womenís movements become the main agency for change? Is the organised working class now redundant? CHRISTINE THOMAS reviews a new publication claiming to have the answers.


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Index 1-100: Click here for a complete index of articles from the first issue of Socialism Today to issue 100

PCS left
A crucial election

Knife crime
Service cut-backs

Youth revolt
Climate strikes

Scotland
A balance sheet 20 years on from the Scottish Socialist Party's initial breakthrough, by Philip Stott

Japan
The lost decades and the ongoing economic and political inertia. Robin Clapp writes